Selected Works

Climate Change
"This is on the short list of key books for anyone who lives in or loves the American southwest--with scientific precision and understated emotional power, it explains what your future holds. If you live elsewhere: it's a deep glimpse into one place on our fast-changing planet, and you'll be able to do many extrapolations. Remarkable work!"
--Bill MCKibben, author Eaarth: Making Life on a Tough New Planet


"As deBuys wanders from Las Vegas to Mesa Verde to the Glen Canyon Dam, he gives the past and present their due as he maps our way to a drier future. No longer are aridity and climate change in the Southwest only of regional interest; deBuys is writing for America and we should all listen to what he has to say.”
--Colleen Mondor, Booklist
Memoir
Supple and silvery ... The Walk defines hope in terms of mountain and sky, river and pine, mindfulness and love.
--Donna Seaman, Booklist
Biography and Memoir
"It brims with gifts of language and vision." --Barbara Kingsolver, New York Times Book Review
History
"This is a grand book, valuable and exquisite on level after level."
--Charles Wilkinson
"This compilation, with skillful editing and commentary by William deBuys, is an essential book for anyone who ventures west of the hundredth meridian." -- Bruce Babbitt, Secretary of the Interior, 1993-2001
"This book is fascinating from beginning to end." --New Mexico Magazine

A GREAT ARIDNESS: Climate Change and the Future of the American Southwest


A Great Aridness, examines the precariousness of life in the Southwest and the likely impact on the region of climate change, which promises to transform the Southwest as emphatically as it is already altering the Arctic.

“The untenable water situation in the Southwest has been the subject of several notable titles (Cadillac Desert, 1986; Running Dry, 2010). Now deBuys takes a broad approach in a manner that affirms his standing beside John McPhee and Wallace Stegner. While he focuses on the environmental science of heat and aridity, he also acknowledges the uncertain nature of climate variability itself. As deBuys wanders from Las Vegas to Mesa Verde to the Glen Canyon Dam, he gives the past and present their due as he maps our way to a drier future. As he walks the Mexican/​American border, ground zero for the immigration debate, he addresses both countries’ undeniable dependence on the Colorado River. At a mountaintop observatory in Arizona, he faces head-on the complicated biopolitics concerning land that is home to an endangered squirrel, crucial to university astronomers, and held sacred by a local tribe. With wide-eyed wonder and the clearest of prose, deBuys explains why we should care about these places, the people he portrays, and the conundrums over land and water he illuminates. No longer are aridity and climate change in the Southwest only of regional interest; deBuys is writing for America and we should all listen to what he has to say.”
--Colleen Mondor, Booklist